Glyphosate - bumblebees on the endangered sources list


With Earth Day in mind I would like to remind gardeners to not use Roundup. The chemical Glyphosate impacts the bee’s intestinal flora causing it’s immune system to be weakened. With bees on the decline we can not compromise their immune systems. 


https://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/insects/rpbb/

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Glyphosate 44” X 30” watercolor monotype 

Hurricane Harvey - Heroes LIVEstock

In my original body of work “Harvey Heroes” the installation. I paid specific attention to selecting images for inspiration from all ethnic backgrounds. During the Hurricane Harvey flood rescue, racial, political gender and religious tensions were washed away. They were not part of the conversation, we were one people. That was the silver lining of Hurricane Harvey, that was what raised our Texas spirit above the flood line. Seeing people of all backgrounds helping each other made me proud to be from Houston. In the installation piece the process I use to get the abstract fluidity marks, dilutes the diversity of skin tones. I feel this process addresses skin tones as Harvey did. The work is very abstract and does not show the details that might define a particular ethnic background, again the spirit of Harvey.

 The exhibition opening was pushed back 30 days, with the extra time I decided to add a few LIVEstock pieces. There were not a lot of images from Harvey of livestock rescues on social media so I created a few of my own.

I regretted I had not made  a buffalo calf rescue piece. Saving the buffalo is my thing. Not long after making the decision to make a buffalo rescue piece I saw an image posted on Instagram of a black cowboy wearing a white hat. Immediately I thought how cool it would be to have a black cowboy rescue a buffalo calf. A white hat would separate a darker skin tone from my murky floodwater background, plus my new 44” X 30” paper and plate would help show more skin tone characteristics than the 22” X 30” pieces that compose the installation.. When I told Curtis what I was planning he, immediately, reminded me of the Buffalo Soldiers. He suggested I visit the Buffalo Museum to make sure it would be acceptable during today’s sensitive times to reference Buffalo Soldiers. The people at the museum were very busy so I did not bother them. I did consulted with one of my friends, artist Romeo Robinson; he liked the idea.

This piece has multiple layers of meaning. It brings attention to the importance of tending to animals in rural environments when floods occur. It brings attention to saving the buffalo from extinction and it addresses regenerative agriculture. Most importantly, it is an opportunity to celebrate and acknowledge the brave men who served our country in the military; the Buffalo Soldiers. They were given the name Buffalo Soldiers by the Native Americans, because the Buffalo Soldiers were as tough, fierce and brown as the American buffalo. They were admirable Americans. They deserve accommodations. While at the buffalo Soldier Museum I learned that the US government has never given the Buffalo Soldiers any accommodations for their service. They fought in the Civil War and WWI, This piece celebrates heroes on a multiple of levels. 

The piece below, the African-American cowboy is rescuing a buffalo calf. The white cowboy hat and white shirt separate the black skin on his face from the chaotic weather in the background.

I made one monotype and two ghost monotypes. See below.

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I hope you like them.  

Hurricane Harvey Heroes- LIVEstock- “chica”

Happiness is finding your favorite goat Chica before the flood. 

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This piece was not inspired by a social media posting. I do feel it is a story worth telling. 

Many thanks to my beloved niece Josette Travis for inspiring this piece.  Thank you so much for helping me with this and being such a great Mom to all the kids. (Does anybody get that joke- all the kids). 

Below are images of Josette and some of Josette and Eric’s kids. 

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Josette feeding one of Chicas babies

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Josette and Chica modeling a goat rescue for me. Photo by Eric travis.   

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4- kids - Danika and Emma feeding 2 baby goats  

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Josette 😍 and kid

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Chica chillin’  

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The Billy goat and my grand niece Danika . I love his beard. 

 

 

Hurricane Harvey - sculpture day 37 “bringing home the bacon”

Photographer Nash Baker getting the lighting just right before we take the piece of the pedestal. 

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Hurricane Harvey - sculpture day 36 “bringing home the bacon”

Each piece is sewn onto the sculpture with a piece of wire in at least three places. It is slow meticulous work. It is a meditation. I have to really slow down and look very carefully for the best places to connect each piece to the sculpture. The wires used to attach the pieces can not look functional. The connections have to be hidden. My goal is to keep the water light and moving. Harvey was all about the water. 

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Hurricane Harvey - sculpture day 30 “bringing home the bacon”

Hurricane Harvey - sculpture day 28 “bringing home the bacon”

Today’s ingredients  

Hay, string and wire-cloth to be mixed with plaster. 

Hay, string and wire-cloth to be mixed with plaster. 

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The left leg Preplaster  

 

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Hoof vibrations