“score” #32- artist statement

 

 Or I should say the dreaded writing of the artist statement. As much as I hate writing, it is while writing the statement that I discover, in a conscious manner, the many layers of the sculpture.

Early on, I started thinking about the artist statement for “score.” Below is my first run and comments given to me by one of my mentors, MFAH Core fellow Devin Kenny 

(http://www.devinkenny.info/About).

Much of Devin’s work is music related and he is a writer and sculptor, so I was extremely excited to get his take. He was very generous to give me written comments.

 My first draft with comments handwritten

My first draft with comments handwritten



 When Devin and I met on January 25th. I had just finished the armature so the sculpture looked like this. 

When Devin and I met on January 25th. I had just finished the armature so the sculpture looked like this. 


Since that time, I am much closer to completing the piece. I was not able to make it to my studio today, so I pulled out Devin’s comments, reread my 30+ blog posts about making the sculpture (some of which I have not yet posted) and came up with the following statement. 

 The sculpture at the end of the day yesterday. 

The sculpture at the end of the day yesterday. 



 “score” 

artist statement

 ”Score” is a sculpture of energy, sound, the physical act of playing contemporary classical music, and its primal impact on emotions. I was inspired by a long exposure photograph of my cousin, Arkansas Symphony Concert Master Andrew Irvin, that captured multiple images as he played his violin. I was struck by the simple back and forth movements of a bow, composed of horse hair, drawn across strings that creates emotionally charged sounds. I cannot carry a tune, I don’t understand musical terms, I have never played or tried to play an instrument, and I don’t sing; I danced, I took many years of ballet. When I listen to music, I feel emotion and see movement. In this piece, the music radiates off the musician as he plays, as well as off the strings of the violin, sometimes like a painfully slow waltz, and sometimes with the sharpness of a quickstep. Working on the piece during the last weeks of my father’s life I examined each movement of the bow and the wire/sound that comes off the violin. Some warble and then end sharply like a tear running down a cheek. Others gently twist into a whisper that fades into a broken heart, and some linger and then like a murmuration of birds pivot and is set free, each movement triggering a unique emotion. I applied the concept of seeing multiple images, and seeing music as emotional energy into three dimensional form. The piece is built on a steel armature covered in plaster, recycled wire cloth, and baling wire.

 

I am not yet finished with the sculpture, so the statement may not be complete as well.

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