Human chain stand alone piece- Instagram post noticed

Voyage Houston reached out to me regarding my stand alone piece of the human chain - See the email below. 

Hi Cindee Klement,

Just saw this post on Instagram and absolutely LOVED it! 

https://www.instagram.com/p/Be4PSIqFEWi/?taken-by=cindeeklementart

Can we feature this shot and credit you? I think our readers would love seeing your work and learning more about you.

Thanks and happy a great week!

Cheers,

Leo

 

And the answer is - yes please do, as I try to contain my excitement. 

I hope this pans out, 

small steps  

 

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Human chain- a stand alone

While working on my human chain for the Galveston beach home, I did this stand alone piece.  
It would have been the third piece of five in the chain, but it has a different feel to it. As a result, I did another third piece and will keep this one as a stand alone.

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Galveston human chain


 I am making a human chain for a beautiful home on the beach in Galveston. The home is professionally decorated in very specific neutral whites with shades of grey, beige and a drop of the magenta you find in oysters, sometimes. The sun in Galveston is very bright and veils the room in light which turns most neutrals green.

I did one series last week testing out the colors and sure enough the first three in the series have too much yellow; they look much greener in the room. The last two in the series looked great. My plan is to put a few chains together in different hues and run down to Galveston and see what looks the best in the Galveston Light. In the end having a few variations might workout nicely for a human chain lenticular. 

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“Score” #22

I am still attaching lath. Today I worked on the left hand and forearm,  the face and head. Attaching only enough to give me something to grip the Concrete. Sone of the rebar will be exposed. 

 

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left hand 

 

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left side of face 

 

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right side of the head 

 

 

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looking at this image the head looks weirdly shaped. I will have to love k at that tomorrow. 

 

 

The shoes-  

I have not decided what is the best way to go obiut the shoes. They are crucial for stabilizing the piece.  

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left foot armature 

right foot armatur.   

right foot armatur. 

 

Telephone interview - Airport art in Texas

Friday January 26th I received an email via my website from Gene Fowler. I am horrible with names, I knew his name but could not place it. A quick google and ........he wrote an article in Glasstire that I actually blogged about recently. http://www.cindeeklement.com/blog/2017/11/12/why-are-some-people-ready-why-do-some-people-know-the-moment 

You can only imagine the excitement I felt when I  put 2 and 2 together. 

 Screenshot of the email 

 Screenshot of the email 

Below I have pasted the paragraph and a link to  article that touched me. 

 “The title That Day underscores the viewer’s sense of being there beside the photographer and the way in which the captured moment remains ever fresh in the image, some of which were made as early as 1979. That was the year when Dallas-based Wilson began assisting Richard Avedon with his own six-year photography project, In The American West. Describing Avedon’s portraiture process in her 2004 book, Avedon At Work In The American West, Wilson noted that he would wait for what Eudora Welty called “a story teller’s truth… the moment in which people reveal themselves. You have to be ready, in yourself; you have to know the moment when you see it.” “ 

 

 http://glasstire.com/2017/11/12/laura-wilsons-that-day-pictures-in-the-american-west/

He called me Monday and I rambled on about hats and their truth, their stories and the moment I was ready to hear their stories.

 

I am sure that he is interviewing several artist regarding  their work in the Texas airports. The hope to make the cut.   

The Nasher Sculpture Center- the term Pareidolia.


We were in Dallas for a very special wedding, and managed to squeeze in the “First Sculpture, handaxe to figure stone” exhibit at the Nasher Sculpture Center. I came away with a new term that applies to my “peace pigeon project.” I was not aware that there was a term for seeing shapes or make pictures out of randomness. 

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Photo of the museums description of exhibit. 

 

Below are three examples of pareidolia faces in the early handaxes that stood out.  

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Hat collection

It does not matter what country they come from- 

When I saw these in Marburger Texas I was moved by the beautiful story each of them holds. 

 . Woven in felt, every hat tells a story, shaped with memories, recording beliefs, and veiling sorrow, some eloquent and some twisted. Cradled in our imagination, they blow in strange, wonderful ways, spinning from generations that are inhabited by our respect for balancing our present responsibilities and fears. In generations past, in fable and in legend, hats sheltered spirits, represented people and occupations, and defended against the elements. 

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4 sombreros from the 1850’s each hand sewn and one of them is signed.  

 

I have been working with hats for about four years And had to add these to my collection. 

“broken” - Artist statement

In today’s art world an important part of being an artist is writing a good artist statement. Ugh! Writing is and always has been a struggle for me. I have to write, read, rewrite, read, rewrite and ask lots of those close to me to look at what I have written. And after all that I will still have typos and all kinds of grammatical errors. Last fall I worked on my artist statement for “Broken”. I have 3 statements for the piece; the first is less than 200 words, as many calls limit the statement to 200 words, the second is a a bit briefer and the third I will use when I use the piece to address the homeless problem in a more universal context other than just Greece. Here are the latest versions of my statements for “Broken”.

 

 

 

“Broken”193 words

The tone is set at the top. Negligent leadership turns a blind eye to the suffering of its most vulnerable.

Inspired by a vivid memory from my travels in Greece of a refugee/homeless man whose posture had physically changed from a lifetime of panhandling I walked by him several times, he always sat in a recessed doorway of a vacant retail space. The day I cannot forget he was sitting on the ground with his legs crossed, he had fallen asleep. His head had fallen forward and sunk beneath his shoulders. His right arm was out stretched holding a spare change cup. His arm looked impossibly long from many years of stretching it forward, wishful for handouts. In addition, poor financial decisions have left the government/country in faulty fiscal health. This is ironic for a country whose ancient symbol is a wise owl and is considered the cradle of western civilization. Weighing on the abstract figures back will be an owl turning a blind eye to the suffering of its most vulnerable. I will use materials that reflect the white of the ancient ruins and mangled and rusted steel from destroyed barricades left mangled at the Technical university. The piece will be aesthetically raw and broken physically as well as in spirit.

 

Edited version

“Broken - Greece 151 words

The tone is set at the top. Negligent leadership turns a blind eye to the suffering of its most vulnerable.

Inspired by a homeless man whose posture had physically changed from a lifetime of panhandling. I remember he was sitting on the ground with his legs crossed; he had fallen asleep. His head had fallen forward and sunk beneath his shoulders. His right arm, impossibly long from many years of stretching forward, wishful for handouts was out stretched holding an empty spare change cup. An owl,once the symbol of ancient Greece, cradle of western civilizationis perched on the figures back turning a blind eye as have Greece’s political leaders neglected it’s most vulnerable. The white concrete reflects the white of the Greek ancient ruins; the rusted steel references destroyed barricades left mangled at the Technical university. The piece is raw and broken physically as well as in spirit.

 

“Broken” 102 words (not specific for Greece)

Society turns a blind eye to the suffering of its most vulnerable.

Inspired by a homeless man whose posture had physically changed from a lifetime of panhandling. I remember he saton the ground with his legs crossed and had fallen asleep. His head had fallen forward and sunk beneath his shoulders. His right arm, impossibly long from many years of stretching it forward, wishful for handouts was outstretched holding an empty cup. An owl,percheson his backindifferent to his circumstances. Constructed from white concrete and mangled wire,the piece is raw and broken physically as well as in spirit.

Wednesday I will meet photographer Nash Baker http://www.nashbaker.com/ to photograph the piece. I can’t wait to see it professionally photographed.